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There is a line drawn in the sand between humans and the wild.

Upon this line we can stand on tiptoes and marvel at what we see - but that line should never be crossed, for their sakes and ultimately, for ours !

 

 INDIAN TIGER ( Panthera  tigris) `

 

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The Tiger couple at Bandhabgad National Park,   M. P. Central India. (Clik the photo to show the enhanced view)

Local Name :

  Hindi : Baagh , Sher .

Size :

  Measured in a straight line between pegs few Indian tigers exceed 10 ft. ( 300 cm.) in length. The average is 9 ft. Average weight male 400-500 lb. ( 180-230 kg.) ; female about 100lb. ( 45 kg.) less. Tigers from the Himalayas generally show a slightly superiority in size over tigers from Madhya Pradesh and southern India.

Distinctive Characters :

  The Indian Tiger is rich-coloured, well-striped animal with a short coat. We have still to learn whether the Indian Tiger varies in the different States, and what differences in its coloration are produced by season and age. Individual variation is great.

Distribution :

  The Indian Tiger designated as the typical Tiger, is found northern, north-eastern, central and south-western India, except in the deserts of Rajasthan, The Punjab, Cutch and Sind.     

Habits :

  The Indian Tiger lives in humid evergreen forests, in dry open jungle, and in the grassy swamps of the terai, in the Sundarbans it leads an almost amphibious life in a terrain of trees, mud and water. Three things are essentialto the Tiger, the neighbourhood of large animals upon which it can pray, ample shade to sleep in and water to quench its thirst. Ordinarily the Tiger hunts between sunset and dawn but should the day be cold or clouded with rain, it will be up and about.It hunts game of all kinds including femal or young elephants, gaur, buffalo, deer, wild boar or nilgai. Many, in the absence of game animals or from oppertunity, take to cattle-killing. In India many Tigers seem to mate after the rain and the majority of young are born between February and May. Whether the Tiger is always monogamous is not known. Tigers with more than one female in train have been seen. Association with male and female appears to end when the cubs are born. The period of gestation is said to be 15 to 16 weeks. Usually 2-3, but as many as 6, may be produced in a litter. The cubs wander about their lair, and when about 6 months old accompany the mother in her hunting and may stay with her until quite 2 years old, and even after she has acquired a new mate. Sexual maturity is attained at 3 years of age by the tigress and at 4 by the tiger. The life span of the tiger is estimated to be about 20 years.

Fate :

  Killed and poached for the skins and bones for the belief of its aphrodisiac power.

Link:[ http://www.hindu.com/thehindu/holnus/001200906201181.htm ][ http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Earth/Rampant-killing-of-tigers-by-poachers/articleshow/4748603.cms ]

 

 

 

 

 INDIAN ONE-HORNED RHINO ( Rhinoceros unicornis)

   

 

   

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Indian One-horned Rhino at Kaziranga National Park, Assam   (Clik the photo to show the enhanced view)

Local Name :

  Hindi : Gainda .

Size :

  One of the largest of all existing rhino. A male may reach over 6 ft. (180 cm.) at the shoulder. The average height about 5ft. 8inch. (170 cm.) It is smaller than the African White rhino but larger than the African Black Rhino. The horns do not compare in length with the African species. The record from Assam measures 24 inc. (61 cm.) at the present day is a good average.

Distinctive    Characters :

  The skin of this massive creature is divided into great shields by heavy folds before and behind the shoulders and in front of the thighs. The fold in front of the shoulders is not continued right across the back, a distinctive character of this Rhino. On the flanks, shoulders and hindquarters, the skin is studded with masses of rounded tubercles. With its grotesque build, long boat-shaped head, its folds of armour, and its tuberculated hide, the animal looks like a monster of some bygone ages.

Distribution :

  Formerly extensively distributed in the Gangetic plain today it is restricted to parts of Nepal and West Bengal in the north, the Dooars, and Assam. In Nepal it is found only in thecountry to the east of Gandak River known as Chitawan, in Assam in isolated areas of the plainslike Kaziranga Sanctuary in Nowgong district.

Habits :

  Though it prefers swamp and grass the Great Indian One-horned Rhino is also found in wood jungle up ravines and low hills. The animal is solitary as a rule, though several may occupy the same patch of jungle. Its foods consists chiefly of grass. The Rhino has particular place for dropping its excreta; so mounds accumulate in places. In approaching these spots a rhino walks backwards and falls an easy victim to poachers. Breeding takes place at all times of the year. The period of gestation is about 16 months and the young at birth is 105 cm. in length and 60 kg. in weight. The female attains sexual maturity in 4 years and the male when 7 years old. 

Fate :

  Killed and poached for the horn for the belief of its aphrodisiac power.
Link:[http://blogs.nationalgeographic.com/blogs/news/chiefeditor/2009/07/rhino-poaching-crisis.html ]

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